Ontogeny trumps Phylogeny

A recent paper published by Museum of the Rockies paleontologists John Scannella and Jack Horner, “synonymy through phylogeny, illustrates that Torosaurus, a genus originally described by OC Marsh, is in fact an adult form of Triceratops.  For a basic article on the topic, click here.  The citation information for the original Scannella and Horner article is as follows, and is available here if you have access to the Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology:

Scannella, J., & Horner, J. (2010). Torosaurus Marsh, 1891, is Triceratops Marsh, 1889 (Ceratopsidae: Chasmosaurinae): synonymy through ontogeny, Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, 30 (4), 1157-1168.

Publications such as this one highlight the difficulty with which paleontologists define species.  It’s generally impossible to go back and look at skin (with a few key exceptions, such as the hadrosaur “mummy” at the AMNH), behavior, or other non-skeletal traits.  Thus, paleontologists are stuck trying to define species and genera from bones  alone, more often than not.  However, this article highlights the self-correcting nature of science.  While any historian of science can highlight numerous social influences on science, when at its best, science  in fact can be a self-correcting enterprise.  OC Marsh described Torosaurus and Triceratops as two separate genera.  Scannella and Horner come along a century later, with more specimens to compare, and correct Marsh’s mis-classification.  This is self-correcting science at its best.

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Explore posts in the same categories: geology, history of science, paleontology

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